Between military moves and following her husband's career all over the world Wendy Jo racked up a lot of time working with children and adults across the spectrum from populations with special needs to elite athletes. Although her passion for culinary nutrition and reaching optimal wellness through the foods we eat is what stands out most when speaking to Wendy Jo. Wendy Jo has spent time in the classroom, in an office, at a hospital, behind a computer, and on a stage dishing out the latest and greatest on nutrition science. Her enthusiasm regarding food as medicine is infectious. As a masters level dietitian she has been trained to challenge the norm, search the science, and move forward with an evidence-based approach. She is the co-author of the Mediterranean Diet Cookbook For Dummies 1st & 2nd editions, Born To Eat: Whole, healthy foods from baby's first bite, and Adrenal Fatigue For Dummies. Her mantra an edible approach to a life worth tasting, goes hand-in-hand with her approach and beliefs about feeding her family, working with clients and developing recipes. Wendy Jo savors every second helping others to slow down and savor life too.
Being healthy is really about being at a weight that is right for you. The best way to find out if you are at a healthy weight or if you need to lose or gain weight is to talk to a doctor or dietitian, who can compare your weight with healthy norms to help you set realistic goals. If it turns out that you can benefit from weight loss, then you can follow a few of the simple suggestions listed below to get started.

"Anytime you’re stressed, you probably go for food," Dr. Seltzer says. (Have we met?!) That’s because cortisol, the stress hormone, stokes your appetite for sugary, fatty foods. No wonder it’s associated with higher body weight, according to a 2007 Obesity study that quantified chronic stress exposure by looking at cortisol concentrations in more than 2,000 adults’ hair.

There are several ways to drop a few pounds, but one thing's for sure: Exercise helps you lose the weight and keep it off. Carving out enough time for aerobic exercise and strength and flexibility training (including yoga and/or pilates) will help you increase lean muscle mass and get fit. Aim for five days a week of moderate to intense exercise for at least 30 to 60 minutes a day. To lose weight, make sure two to three of those workouts include strength training.
"Take into account your average weight loss over time and don't let weighing in make you crazy," says Anne M. Fletcher, M.S., R.D., L.D. "You need to create a deficit of 3,500 calories to lose 1 pound, which doesn't happen on a day-to-day basis." Find what works for you, because daily weighing can be misleading. For instance, if you eat Chinese food, which tends to be high in sodium, your weight might jump the next day because your body retains water when you eat a lot of salt.
Do you mindlessly sprinkle salt on your food without even tasting it first? Stop it! Seriously. Extra sodium can lead to water weight gain and bloating, which will make your pants fit tighter (and the number on the scale tick up). Be sure to read your labels, too; sodium is typically lurking in in processed foods, even “healthy” ones like frozen dinners and canned soups.
If you watch TV often, you've probably seen a commercial pop up for Jenny Craig. When you do the diet, you receive a unique weight loss plan for your specific lifestyle and have a personal consultant to check in with at least once a week. And, the meals are delicious: There are more than 100 menu items to choose from for your meals, which are five a day plus one snack of your own.
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